The Belgian midfielder seems destined to join the Serie A champions, who are also monitoring young talents in the domestic league

Juventus are taking a “wait and see” approach to the signing of Zenit midfielder Axel Witsel, says the club’s general director Giuseppe Marotta.

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The Serie A champions have long-since courted the Belgium international and reportedly missed out on his signature during the close-season.

Marotta confirmed earlier this week that Juve are hoping to strike a deal for Witsel, whose contract is up at Zenit in June, during the January transfer window.

But the Bianconeri are prepared to be patient to land their target.

“It’s difficult to imagine much happening in January, as it’s difficult to find a player who can come in and raise the quality of a group such as ours at this point of a season,” Marotta told the club’s official website.

“There’s no news regarding Witsel. He’s a good player, let’s wait and see what happens. 

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“All I can say is that we’re a stable club with an ever growing revenue and economic strength that has enabled noteworthy investments of late such as the transfers of Gonzalo Higuain and Miralem Pjanic. 

“The club’s objectives go in tandem with those of the team.”

Juve have also been linked with Atalanta duo Mattia Caldara and Roberto Gagliardini, but Marotta says other young Italian talents are being monitored.

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He added: “Of course, we’re working all the time to invest in young talents who deserve to be given a chance. We’ve spoken to Atalanta, but not only them.”

Juve are in Doha ahead of the Supercoppa Italiana against AC Milan, but the Rossoneri’s flight was delayed and the club’s CEO Adriano Galliani suggested they might not fulfil the fixture if they do not have ample time to prepare.

But Marotta expects a solution to be found.

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“Adriano Galliani is a wise and experienced football director and I’m sure he’ll know how to overcome this particular hitch,” he said.

“We’ve respected the timetable, but I don’t think that arriving 24 hours earlier or later will change much. There are actually some theories that suggest it’s better to arrive closer to the game. 

“Nonetheless, what’s happened can be considered a lesson to learn from in the future.”